Friday, February 24, 2017

Reading Period 18: Feb 24 - Mar 2: Twenty Thousand Leagues

Due Dates:
Quiz: Monday, February 27
Assignments: Wednesay, March 1

Long Read: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne, Part 2. This is a lot! You can do it though! And remember, we'll have a "rest week" after this, so if you don't get it entirely done, you can catch up then.

Poems:
"The Kraken" by Lord Alfred Tennyson
"The Chambered Nautilus" by Oliver Wendell Holmes

Creative Assignments:

Write a poem with one of the following first lines:

Far away into the sickly light
In roaring he shall rise
On the sweet summer wind
In gulfs enchanted, where the siren sings
The stars, she whispers, blindly run
O heart, how fares it with thee now?

Your poem must contain simile, metaphor, alliteration, and both visual and aural imagery.

OR

Create a colorful illustration of Captain Nemo's ship, The Nautilus. You can put it in any environment you choose -- maybe in a kelp forest, or on the surface of the ocean, or mounted in a case in a museum. You should use details from the book to create your illustration but you can also use your imagination. PLEASE CONSIDER DOING THE POEM IF YOU CAN MANAGE! Remember we are all (all!) going to submit to the Norfolk Public Library Poetry Contest.


Writing Assignments:

At the end of the novel, we are left wondering who Captain Nemo was, why he was so bitterly set against society, and whether he even survived the Maelstrom. Write a 250 word essay about Captain Nemo in which you use quotes and specific details to describe his character. In your conclusion, give your opinion about why Jules Verne left his identity and fate a mystery, and whether this was a good idea.

OR

Remember H. G. Wells' rhetorical technique of "the plausible impossible"? Do you see places in the novel where Jules Verne is using this same technique? The Nautilus visits real places like shipwrecks of real battles and the Transatlantic Telegraph Cable, but the ship also visits made up places like the lost city of Atlantis. How does Jules Verne make the unbelievable believable by giving lots of details and making things seem normal? How does he make the impossible seem plausible? Maybe it's his choice of narrator, of the way things are described, or the diction. Write a 250 word essay in which you give several examples, including quotes.

Quiz:

Define these vocabulary words and use them in a sentence.

1. Ambient
2. Ardent
3. Despotism
4. Effulgence
5. Indefatigable
6. Promontory
7. Sonorous
8. Tacit
9. Undulation
10. Capricious

Friday, February 17, 2017

Reading Period 17: Feb 17-23: Twenty Thousand Leagues

"Hey yeah it's Jules. Victorian
Sci-Fi is kind of my thing."
Long Read: 

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne, chapters 7-24. (To the end of Part 1)

Poems:

"With Rue My Heart is Laden" by A. E. Housman

WITH rue my heart is laden
  For golden friends I had,
For many a rose-lipt maiden
  And many a lightfoot lad.

By brooks too broad for leaping        
  The lightfoot boys are laid;
The rose-lipt girls are sleeping
  In fields where roses fade.

"The Winds Out of the West Winds Blow" by A. E. Housman

THE WINDS out of the west land blow,
  My friends have breathed them there;
Warm with the blood of lads I know
  Comes east the sighing air.

It fanned their temples, filled their lungs,        
  Scattered their forelocks free;
My friends made words of it with tongues
  That talk no more to me.

Their voices, dying as they fly,
  Loose on the wind are sown;        
The names of men blow soundless by,
  My fellows’ and my own.

Oh lads, at home I heard you plain,
  But here your speech is still,
And down the sighing wind in vain        
  You hollo from the hill.

The wind and I, we both were there,
  But neither long abode;
Now through the friendless world we fare
  And sigh upon the road.

Creative Assignments: 

Create an color illustration for "With Rue My Heart is Laden" in which you include all the images of the poem. Yes, this is yet another memory strategy! Speak it, write it, illustrate it, listen to it, look at it, and when you get to class, be ready to recite it.

OR

Choose one of the four A.E. Housman poems we've read, and write a poem with a similar theme. Living in the moment, regretting not listening to wise advice, or missing friends. Here are the rules for this poem: 1. You must use the word "rue." 2. You must write in four-line stanzas. 3. You must include some kind of rural imagery.

Look, it's Shropshire!
Writing Assignments:

Conseil is an interesting character. He's not the hero, but he does play an important role. His name means "advice." Write a 250 word essay about Conseil, in which you describe his character using quotes and specific words from the text to back up your analysis. What is he like? What does he do? What role does Conseil play in the story -- sidekick? foil character? comic relief? Why is he there? Decide which archetype you think best fits him, and make a case for it using events from the book.

OR

You may have seen movies or read books about travel to faraway stars, or even just to our neighboring planet, Mars. Fictional people who embark on voyages like this find themselves in similar circumstances to what Captain Nemo describes for himself and his crew: outside of society, no longer bound by it, and not able to return to it. Thinking about the prospects of adventure that Nemo offers to Arronax, and the prospect of long-term space travel that you yourself may embark on one day, write an essay about the decision to leave what you know behind, possibly forever, and exchange it for the chance to explore the unknown. Is this something that you would ever do? Would the benefit of satisfying your curiosity for new worlds outweigh the sadness of leaving behind the world that you know? What would you do? Write a 300 word essay in which you discuss this.



OR

Captain Nemo gives an inspiring speech about the freedom of the seas. Research the phrase "international waters" and write a 300 word essay explaining what is meant by this. Are the seas really free? What can you do in the middle of the ocean and who has jurisdiction? Where does one country's sovereignty end and another's begin? What about air space? The sea bed? Are these areas really free? Use a quote from Nemo's speech in the book (chapter 10) in your essay, and cite your source.

Quiz:

1. What do Ned Land and Dr. Arronax discover about the giant narwhal?
2. Translate the phrase "Mobilis in Mobile."
3. What condition does the captain put on his "guests" as they stay aboard the ship?
4. Why does Arronax not believe that the Nautilus is powered by electricity?
5. How does Captain Nemo explain his collision with the Scotia?
6. During their exploration of the Forest of Crespo, which is impossible: sleep or speaking?
7. What was so terrible about seeing the ship, The Florida?
8. At the new year, Conseil and Ned Land have different opinions about their time on the Nautilus. Which wants to stay and which is anxious to escape?
9. What is Captain Nemo's solution for getting off the reef on which the Nautilus is stuck at high tide?
10. Why do Arronax, Land, and Conseil have to leave the island in a hurry?

Friday, February 10, 2017

Reading Period 16: Feb 10 - 16: Twenty Thousand Leagues

Long Read:

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas by Jules Verne, chapters 1-6

Creative Assignment:

Write a 250 word newspaper article in which you start a completely fantastical rumor that you've spotted a sea monster. Use H.G. Wells' technique of "the plausible impossible" by using very specific details and believable elements in your story.

OR

Claude Monet's "Impression, Sunrise" was painted two years after the publication of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. This was the work that gave Impressionism its name. Using crayons, colored pencils, acrylic paint, watercolor, or any other colorful medium you choose, create your own version of this famous painting. You can try to replicate the original as closely as possible, or you can put your own spin on it by changing the colors, the style, the elements of the painting, or whatever else you choose.




Writing Assignment:

At the end of chapter 4, Dr. Arronax explains why people can live with atmospheric pressure, and why fish at the bottom of the ocean would have to be metal plated to withstand the water pressure at great depths. Investigate the validity of this science, and write a 250 word essay in which you give your reader Dr. Arronax's explanation, say whether or not it's correct and why, and then describe the real situation if otherwise. This should lead you to at least three paragraphs. If you are in Ms. Cynthia's physics class, you must explore this option,.

OR

Chapter 1 mentions "the inclination of the human mind to seek the fantastic" and then goes on to describe how the possibility of a "monster" came into fashion in "all the big cities." Do you think if a sea monster was spotted that people would write songs and plays about it? Do you think that the battle over "the monsters subject" should be won by believers or unbelievers? Write an essay of 250 words in which you give your opinion, supported with evidence, on whether people do indeed seek the "fantastic" or want to believe in monsters in the world, and whether or not this is a good thing. If you are in Ms. Maryann's class, you must explore this option.

If you are in Ms. Cynthia's class *AND* Ms. Maryann's class, you can take your pick.

Quiz:

1. Which event is referred to in the first paragraph?
2. Give an example of Jules Verne using H.G. Wells' technique of the plausible impossible.
3. Describe the hole in the Scotia's hull.
4. What does Dr. Arronax suppose the giant creature is?
5. What is a babirusa? Look it up and give me a link to a picture.
6. What is Ned Land's job?
7. What promise did Captain Farragut make to his crew on the second of November?
8. Who was the first to spot the creature?
9. What strange phenomenon did the crew observe about the creature?
10. In what situation does Professor Arronax find himself at the end of chapter 6?

Friday, February 3, 2017

Reading Period 15: February 3 - 9: The Time Machine

Lunch with Eloi
Due Dates:

Quiz: Monday, February 6
Assignments: Wednesday, February 8

Long Read:

The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, chapters 6 - Epilogue

Poems: 

Loveliest of Trees the Cherry Now by A.E. Housman (1896)

When I was One and Twenty by A.E. Housman (1896)

Creative Assignment: 

Pretend you are 5000 years in the future, and you are touring a museum of 2017. What will you find there? Think of ten and only ten items to include as exhibits in this museum. You may choose to illustrate this on unlined paper in color, with the items clearly labeled, or write a list with a short description of each one.

OR

Choose two paragraphs from the book which you feel create two very different moods. It might be you choose one paragraph describing the pleasant life of the Eloi, and one describing the dangers of the Morlocks. Which specific words in the text contribute to the mood you're experiencing? Create an illustration for each one of these paragraphs, in which you incorporate the words you identified. They can be part of the drawing, or you can write them over the drawing, or the words can take the shape of trees or plates or stalactites -- however you choose.

Lunch with Morlocks
Writing Assignments:

The Time Traveler refers to mistakes that he made, either in his judgment or in his decisions. Of course we know that the author, H.G. Wells, created this character and wrote those mistakes for him. Why? Write a short essay about the Time Traveler's mistakes and their meaning. Choose two or three mistakes that you feel the Time Traveler made, and for each one, discuss what it was, how it affected the plot, and why you think Wells thought that mistake was necessary, either to further the plot or for the reader's understanding.

OR

Reread the first four paragraphs of chapter 10. The Time Machine was written in 1895, when technology was progressing at an intense pace, almost as fast as it is progressing today. Think about the changes that have taken place in our world in the last twenty years -- the internet, mobile phones, social media. Do you think that in our society there is an Overworld and an Underworld? A part of the world more connected to pleasure and prettiness and a part of the world more connected to machines and work? Write a short essay in which you compare the Overworld and Underworld in the book with our world today.

Quiz:

1. What piece of equipment does the Time Traveller wish he had taken into the future?
2. Reclining under the stars, what food does the Time Traveller decide that the Morlocks must be eating?
3. What, according to the Time Traveller, was the original purpose of the Palace of Green Porcelain?
4. At night, what does Weena want to play with that troubles the Time Traveller?
5. The Time Traveller says that as the Morlocks attack him “The darkness seemed to grow luminous.” What causes this?
6. How does the Time Traveller get inside the pedestal to his Time Machine?
7. Where does the Time Traveller go in his Machine?
8. Upon returning to his laboratory, what does the Time Traveller see Mrs. Watchett do?
9. After telling his story to his guests, how does the Time Traveller reassure himself that the story is really true?
10. What does the Medical Man want to take with him?

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Reading Period 14: Jan 20-26: The Time Machine

Due Dates:
Quiz: Wednesday, Feb 1
Assignments: Friday, Feb 3

Long Read:

The Time Machine by H. G. Wells, chapters 1-5

Short Read:

"A Sound of Thunder" by Ray Bradbury

Creative Assignment:

Several artists and illustrators in the last hundred years have attempted to represent the actual time machine in H. G. Wells' novel. There's even a movie prop! Try not to be influenced by these creations, however, as you imagine a colorful illustration of the Time Machine. Your time machine should fit in the story -- it needs a special lever and a saddle and should make sense with the plot -- but doesn't need to resemble the movie version in any other way.

OR

Pretend you are looking thousands of years into the future, and humanity has evolved far from our current state. In this future, everything is wonderful and has worked out perfectly. Write a 250-word description of what you see. "Utopia" is a word that means a perfect world -- for some that would be a peaceful world where everyone shares and is nice to each other. For others that might mean a world of robots where organic life has been totally destroyed. A garden world? A world where everyone is perfectly healthy? A world where we can eat pizza and cookies all day, and never get high cholesterol? What does a future "utopia" look like to you? How did it come about? What path should we choose now, as a species, to reach that future world?

Writing Assignment:

At the end of chapter 4, in the last few pages, the Time Traveler speculates as to what has happened to bring humanity to the situation he encounters in this future world. Carefully read the section that begins, "It seemed to me that I had happened upon humanity upon the wane." Now pretend the Time Traveler had sat down with paper and pencil to write a warning to the humans of his time. He wants to give them advice and instruction as to how to avoid the future he has found. What does he say? Write a 250 word Begin your paper like this: "My fellow humans, please listen to this warning!"

OR

After reading this section of The Time Machine and also "A Sound of Thunder," write an essay in which you say whether you would travel to the future or to the past, if you had the chance to travel in time and had to choose where to go. You must state a clear opinion -- don't make a case for both sides! In your essay of 250 words, use both stories as illustrations for your decision.

Quiz:

1. According to the Time Traveler, what is the Fourth Dimension?
2. What happened to the first Time Machine?
3. What kind of food does the Time Traveler crave in chapter 2?
4. What did the Time Traveler do to be sure that the little people would not tamper with the time machine or damage it?
5. In approximately what year had the Time Traveler landed?
6. Returning from his long walk, what causes the Time Traveler to panic?
7. What does the Time Traveler think he hears when he bangs his fist on the pedestal of the Sphinx?
8. How does the Time Traveler make a new friend and what is his new friend’s name?
9. What lesson did the Time Traveler learn from his new friend?
10. What does the Time Traveler call the people from the lower world?

Friday, January 13, 2017

Reading Period 13: Jan 13-19: Bud, Not Buddy

Long Read: Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

Short Read: "Everyday Use" by Alice Walker

Poem: "It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing" by Duke Ellington

"It Don't Mean A Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)"

It don't mean a thing, if it ain't got that swing
(doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah)
It don't mean a thing all you got to do is sing
(doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah)
It makes no difference
If it's sweet or hot
Just give that rhythm
Everything you've got

It don't mean a thing, if it ain't got that swing
(doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah)
It don't mean a thing all you got to do is sing
(doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah)
It makes no difference
If it's sweet or hot
Just give that rhythm
Everything you've got
It don't mean a thing, if it ain't got that swing
(doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah, doo-ah)

It makes no difference
If it's sweet or hot
Just give that rhythm
Everything you've got
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing
It don't mean a thing all you got to do is sing
(doo-ah)
It makes no difference
If it's sweet or hot
Just give that rhythm
Everything you've got
Don't mean a thing all you've gotta do is swing
It don't mean a thing all you've gotta do is sing
It makes no difference
If it's sweet or hot
Give that rhythm
Everything you've got
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing
(doo-ah, dooooo-aaaaah)
Don't mean a thing



Creative Assignments:

Have a listen to this video of scat singing by Sarah Vaughan. Then find a good instrumental track. Try this one! Now try out your own scat singing to record and post. You can get creative with your phonics, or you can stick with "she-bop" and "doo-wop" too! To be extra jazzerrific, grab a friend and have a scat battle like Louis Armstrong and Danny Kaye.

OR

Art deco is an artistic style in graphics and architecture most associated with early 20th century America and specifically jazz music and culture. Choose one of the images below and recreate it as best you can using colored pencils, markers, or paint.



Stephane Gisclard, The Brooklyn Bridge 

Tamara de Lempicka, 1929, La Musicienne

Amedeo Modigliani, Jeanne Hebuterne with Hat and Necklace


Writing Assignments:

After reading the story "Everyday Use," please also read the short essay by Alice Walker on quilting -- it's part of the same document. In a short essay, answer the question: What makes something valuable? Talk about the value of the grandmother's quilts in the story "Everyday Use" and also the value of the rocks that Herman E. Calloway collects. The quilts have a value that makes Dee want to hang them up instead of wearing them out -- what value is this? The rocks have a value that makes Herman collect them, even though they're just rocks -- what value is this? What value do you place in the things you possess, and where does the value come from? Sentiment? Financial worth? Use both stories as examples, and also include one example from your own experience.

OR

Bud, Not Buddy takes place in the 1930s, when laws were different, and discrimination was sometimes legal. Herman E. Calloway always made sure that one member of his band was white.
Why was it important for him to have a white band member? What could a white man do in the 1930s that a black man wasn't allowed to do? When Bud gets picked up hitchhiking near Owosso, Michigan, he finds out it is a "sundown town" where blacks aren't allowed at night. Choose either Jim Crow Laws or the Supreme Court case Plessy vs. Ferguson. Do a little online research on the topic you choose, and then include your findings in an essay about Bud, Not Buddy in which you discuss how it pertains to the racial discrimination in the book. Make sure you include a link to your source material, and put any direct quotes in quotation marks.

Quiz:

1. What was in Lefty Lewis' backseat that scared Bud?
2. What was Lefty Lewis' reaction to Bud thinking he's a vampire?
3. What is in Lefty's box that he wants to hide from the police?
4. What is the name of Herman E. Calloway's band?
5. What does Bud eat at the Sweet Pea?
6. Whose room is Bud sleeping in?
7. What does "Woop, Zoop, Sloop" mean?
8. What does "he can kiss my wrist" mean?
9. What book about Captain Nemo did Bud's mother read to him?
10. How is Herman E. Calloway related to Bud?

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Reading Period 12: January 6-12: Bud, Not Buddy

Due Dates:
Quiz: Monday, Jan 9, 7pm
Assignments: Wednesday, Jan 11, 7pm

Long Read: Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis, chapters 1-9

Short Read: "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allen Poe

Poetry: "The Jumpin' Jive" by Cab Calloway and his Cotton Club Orchestra

Hep-hep!
De-boodle-de-ack, de-boodle-de-ackasaki!
Hep-hep!
Oh, rang-tang, te-dah-dah,
Hep-hep!
Gonna tell you 'bout the jumpin' jive,
Hep-hep!
Jim, jam, jump, the jumpin' jive;
Hep-hep!
Cats gonna beat out this mellow jive;
Hep-hep!
Beat it out on the mellow side.
Boy?
Whatcha gonna say there, gate?
Oh, boy!
Whatcha gonna say there, gate?
Palomar, Shalomar, Swanee shore,
Let me dig that jive once more,
Boy!
Lay it right on down to the gator.
Oh, boy!
Lay it flat as a gator.
Now, can't you hear those hepcats call,
Yeah!
Come on, boys, let's have a ball!
The jim, jam, jump on the jumpin' jive
Makes you dig your jive on the mellow side,
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
The jim, jam, jump is the solid jive
Makes you nine foot tall when you're four foot five,
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
Now, don't you be that ickeroo,
Get hep, come on and follow through,
Then you get your steady foo,
You make the joint jump like the gators do,
The jim, jam, jump on the jumpin' jive
Makes you like your eggs on the Jersey side,
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
The jim, jam, jumpin' jive
Makes you hep-hep on the mellow side!
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
The jim, jam, jump on the jumpin' jive,
Will make you dig your jive on the mellow side,
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
The jim, jam, jump, the solid jive
Makes you nine foot tall when you're four foot five,
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
Now, don't you be that ickeroo,
Get hep, come on and follow through,
Then you get your steady foo,
You make the joint jump like the gators do,
The jim, jam, jump on the jumpin' jive
Makes you like your eggs on the Jersey side,
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
The jim, jam, jumpin' jive,
Makes you hep-hep on the mellow side;
Hep-hep!
Hep-hep!
(Scat singing)
Now, I've told you 'bout the jumpin' jive,
The jim, jam, jump, the jumpin' jive,
I know you dug this mellow jive,
Oh, you dig it on the mellow side.



Creative Assignments:

Create an illustration for the inside of the Amos shed. Include all the exaggerated imaginings that Bud suffered through while imprisoned there, as well as the real threats. Vampire bats, hornets, fish head guards, stain on the ground, the papered-over window, and any other visuals you remember from the story.

OR

Write from the point of view of Todd Amos, and tell the story of how an orphan named Bud came to live at your house, what you did about it, and what the result was. Even though Todd is a villain in Bud, Not Buddy, try to make him the hero of your 250 words.

Writing Assignments:

Bud is a child who has had limited experiences in the world. As such, his interpretations of some of the things he encounters are not realistic. For example, he believes Todd Amos when Todd tells him that the stain on the floor is from a child's blood. He doesn't think it's a big deal to Grand Rapids from Flint, which we know is too dangerous for someone his age. Bud is what we literary scholars refer to as an unreliable narrator, someone who tells a story but can't be trusted or believed. Sometimes a narrator is deliberately lying to the reader, but sometimes, like Bud, the character is doing his best to tell the truth, but just doesn't know any better. After reading the Edgar Allen Poe story, "The Tell-Tale Heart," write 250 words about the narrator of this story. Is he unreliable? Is he lying to the reader? What makes you doubt his word? Why do you think Poe chose to tell this story from his point of view? What evidence in the text can you point to? Use at least two quotes from the story to back up your observations about the narrator.

OR

Flint, Michigan, was hard-hit during the Great Depression, and it has been in the news recently as well, because of a crisis surrounding public water, which was poisoned by lead from the pipes. Take a look at these three sources which you could use to learn about the Flint water crisis:

Lead-laced Water in Flint: A Step-by-Step Look at the Makings of a Crisis on NPR
Ten Things They Won't Tell You About the Flint Water Tragedy. But I Will. by Michael Moore
Flint Water Crisis on Wikipedia

Write a short essay in which you evaluate these sources as potential research for an essay on the Flint water crisis. You might find that all of them would be useful, but for different aspects of research. You might find that none of them are reliable. Use at least one quote from each source to back up your conclusions.

Hooverville
Quiz:

1. How old was Bud when his mother died?
2. What does Todd Amos do while Bud is asleep?
3. Why was Bugs called that?
4. What revenge does Bud get on Todd?
5. What does Bud's name mean?
6. Why does the man in the line call Bud Clarence?
7. What happened to Bud's friend Miss Hill?
8. What was shady about Bugs' coin toss?
9. Why is the shanty town called Hooverville?
10. What growing-up milestone happens to Bud in Hooverville?