Friday, April 29, 2016

Reading Period 26: May 6 - 12 : A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Class meeting: 

May 10, 12

Due dates: 

Assignments: May 11

Poem:

"Ode on a Grecian Urn" by John Keats



Long read:

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Read new chapters at your own pace.

Creative Assignment:

In class, we worked on connecting stories to numbers in the same way that Francie does in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Maybe you assigned colors or foods or personality types or articles of clothing. For your creative assignment, please list your numbers from 0-9 and their assigned values. Choose four numbers of at least three digits and tell the story that goes with them. You can pick whatever numbers make the best stories -- they don't have to be the ones we worked on in class.

OR

Draw a picture of your D&D character including all the armor, weapons, pets, and any other object he or she possesses. You must use unlined paper and color to complete your art. If you don't choose this option this week, it will be here for you next week. I'd like to put together a gallery to finish off the year of roleplaying adventure. How far we have come from Bunnies and Burrows!

Writing Assignment:

Book Two of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn tells the story of how Francie's parents, Katie and Johnny Dolan, first met and how they got married. Find out how your parents met and got married, and tell the story in a 200, 400, or 600-word narrative essay. You can choose the word length, based on what kind of writing you'd like to do. If you choose 200 words, you'll have to think about what level of detail will be possible in such a short essay -- will you be able to include dialogue? If you choose 600 words, you'll have much more room for detail, but you'll need to be careful that you don't rush through the story and get to the end too soon. Try writing the essay without using the words "I" or "me" -- just write about your parents as if they were characters in a novel. Type your word length choice at the beginning of your essay and try to stay as close to it as possible.

OR

Write the story of your D&D character from as far back as you can remember in a 200, 400, or 600-word narrative essay. You can choose the word length, based on what kind of writing you'd like to do. If you choose 200 words, you'll have to think about what level of detail will be possible in such a short essay -- will you be able to include dialogue? If you choose 600 words, you'll have much more room for detail, but you'll need to be careful that you don't rush through the story and get to the end too soon. Try writing the essay without using the words "I" or "me" -- just write about your character as if he or she were a character in a novel. Type your word length choice at the beginning of your essay and try to stay as close to it as possible.

Quiz:

No quiz! In lieu of a quiz, please make sure you really read the poem.

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