Saturday, November 12, 2016

Reading Period 9: November 11 - 17: Romeo and Juliet

Due dates: 
Quiz: Monday, November 14
Assignments: Wednesday, November 16
Don't forget to print your writing assignment and turn it in, in class, with your outline.

Long read:

Romeo and Juliet Act 5

Short read:

"Rocking Horse Winner" by D.H. Lawrence

Creative Assignments:

If you're going to do one of the poem options, listen to both pieces first and see which one appeals to you.

Take out paper and pencil. Watch this video and listen to the London Symphony perform Tchaikovsky's "Romeo and Juliet Overture." While you are listening, write down the images and feelings that come to your mind. After the piece is over, turn the paper over, and use these images to create a poem of at least twenty lines, titled "Love." The poem doesn't have to have anything to do with the characters or settings of Romeo and Juliet. Focus on using visual imagery to create a mood.

OR

Take out paper and pencil. Watch this video and listen to the London Symphony perform "Dance of the Knights" from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet ballet. While you are listening, write down the images that come to your mind. After the piece is over, turn the paper over, and use these images and feelings  to create a poem of at least twenty lines, titled "Anger." The poem doesn't have to have anything to do with the characters or settings of Romeo and Juliet. Focus on using visual imagery to create a mood.

OR

Salvador Dali
Take a look at these incredibly beautiful and strange illustrations of Romeo and Juliet by surrealist painter Salvador Dali. Figure out which scene in the book is illustrated, and numbering from 1 to 11, give each one a descriptive title. Then using black, red, yellow, and blue only, and imitating the style of Dali, create your own illustration of a scene or idea from Romeo and Juliet.

Writing Assignment:

Watch a movie or stage version of Romeo and Juliet. If you went to see the American Shakespeare Theater perform last week, you can use that experience. Think about the character you play in our production, and the actor who played this character in the production you watched. Write a 250 word essay in which you describe the actor's choices in portraying this character, and then describe the choices you intend to make, whether the same or different, in portraying the character in class. Will you strike out on your own and do a new interpretation of your character? Will you borrow some things from the production you watched? Remember to print out your writing assignment and your outline to turn in on Thursday in class.

OR

Read these two articles (one and two) about Juliet's balcony, a tourist attraction in Verona, Italy. There is no historical basis for believing this is actually Juliet's house, but people like to write messages to her and leave them stuck to the wall. On one hand, people sticking chewing gum onto a historic house is bad, so maybe tourists should be stopped from doing it, and fined. On the other hand, Juliet's balcony brings in a lot of tourist dollars to Verona, and maybe the tourists should be allowed to leave their messages. Write a 250 word essay in which you choose a side and argue that the 500 Euro fine is fair or unfair, based on the information in these two articles. Remember to print out your writing assignment and your outline to turn in on Thursday in class.

Bye, Romeo and Juliet. We're moving on.
Quiz:

Identify the speaker of these important lines in Romeo and Juliet:

1. Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.
2. My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.
3. For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.
4. Peace? I hate the word as I hate hell and all Montagues.
5. A plague on both your houses.
6. Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;
Life and these lips have long been separated:
Death lies on her like an untimely frost
Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.
7. I will make thee think thy swan a crow.
8. If love be rough with you, be rough with love!
9. But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
10. O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse thy name, or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, and I'll no longer be a Capulet.
11. But come, young waverer, come, go with me.
In one respect I'll thy assistant be,
For this alliance may so happy prove
To turn your households' rancor to pure love.
12. I think it best you married with the County. 
O, he's a lovely gentleman! 
Romeo's a dishclout to him.
13. Talk not to me, for I'll not say a word
Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee
14. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church-door; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.
15. Younger than she are happy mothers made. 

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