Friday, January 29, 2016

Reading Period 16: January 30 - February 11: Anne of Green Gables

Class meeting: February 9 and February 11
Due dates: Quiz is due February 8, 7pm. Assignments are due February 10, 7pm.

Long read:

Anne of Green Gables, chapters 1-12

Short read:

"The Nightengale and the Rose" by Oscar Wilde

Poem:

"The Vision of Sir Launfal" by James Robert Lowell
The two lines of poetry at the beginning of chapter 2 come from this poem.

Creative Assignment:

Create an illustration of a scene from "The Nightengale and the Rose." You can use whatever medium you like but you must use some form of the color red and you may not use lined paper.

OR

Write a 200 word diary entry that you might expect to read in Anne's diary on the first night she stays in Avonlea. What is she worried about, anticipating, remembering, and dreaming?

Writing Assignment:

"The Vision of Sir Launfal" is a poem that tells a story. It may take you more than one read-through to understand this story. It may also help you to read it aloud or have someone read it to you. Write a short essay with four paragraphs in it, in which you tell what happens in the poem, using your own words. There are four parts of the poem, and each part should get one paragraph:

Prelude to Part First
Part First
Prelude to Part Second
Part Second.

The first paragraph you write should also give us at least a sentence of introduction to the poem and say what you are going to do in the essay. The last paragraph should include at least a sentence of conclusion, telling what you think the poem means. Make sure you start a new line and indent several spaces when you start a new paragraph. Your whole essay should be at least 200 words. Paragraphs can be short!

OR

Write an essay about the history of Prince Edward Island. You can use the internet to do your research. This might be a good site to start with. Your essay should have four paragraphs as follows:

The Mi'kmaq nation
European discovery and the French settlement
The British settlement
The formation of Canada

You can end your history with 1908, when Anne of Green Gables was published. Make sure you include at least one important date for each paragraph. Make sure you start a new line and indent several spaces when you start a new paragraph. Your whole essay should be at least 200 words. Paragraphs can be short!



Quiz:

1. Why does Mrs. Rachel Lynde go to visit Matthew Cuthbert?
2. Why was Matthew surprised when he saw Anne? What was he expecting?
3. Whose idea is it to keep Anne, and who says no?
4. According to Anne, what is the worst thing about imagining things?
5. How old is Anne?
6. What does Marilla know about Mrs. Blewitt?
7. What two things does Anne ask for in her prayer?
8. Who are Katie Maurice and Violetta?
9. What does Mrs. Rachel Lynde say to Anne that throws her into a temper?
10. What does Marilla realize about Anne's apology that Mrs. Rachel Lynde does not realize?
11. What kind of dress was Anne hoping for?
12. What does Diana's mother tell us about her?

Friday, January 22, 2016

Reading Period 15: January 23 - 29: Over Sea, Under Stone

Class meeting: January 29
Due date: January 28, 7pm

Long read: Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper, chapters 11-14 plus the epilogue.

No short read or poetry assignment this week. Since we had no class meeting, we'll discuss last week's story and poems in class on Friday.

Creative Assignment:

If one British pound in 1965 is equivalent to 18 pounds today, and one pound today is equivalent to 1.5 dollars today, then figure out what the children's 100 pound reward would have been worth in today's dollars. Then make a list of the things you'd buy with that much money, including dollar amounts. You could say "take a trip to Cornwall" but then you'd have to tell me how much the airfare and hotel would be. Of course you could also choose to buy stuffed llamas, but you'd have to figure out how much each would be and how many you could get.

OR

If you meant to hide something that had to stay hidden for hundreds of years, where would you hide it? If you had to leave instructions for someone to find it, what would they be? Create a treasure map or write out how to find your hidden item.

Writing Assignment:

Read this article in The Atlantic: "Why the British Tell Better Children's Stories." Now write 200 words summarizing the article's main idea, and giving your opinion as to whether this is correct or not. Is Over Sea, Under Stone a better book because of England's long and mysterious history? If you quote directly from the article, be sure and use quotation marks.

OR

At the end of the story, Barney is disappointed and says that the Drew children failed their quest, but Great-Uncle Merry argues that they were successful. How did you feel? Were you satisfied by the ending or were you disappointed that the secrets of the grail are still secret? Write 200 words in which you tell me why Barney was disappointed, why Great-Uncle Merry wasn't, and how you felt about the ending. Did it make you want to read more books about Jane, Simon, and Barney?

Quiz:

1. What kind of race was Bill involved in, during the festival?
2. What information does Mr. Penhallow give the children about Mrs. Palk?
3. What were the costumes of the two people who kidnapped Barney?
4. Why does Mr. Hastings say Great-Uncle Merry wants the grail?
5. What was the noise that snapped Barney out of his trance?
6. What important info did Mr. Penhallow give the children that will allow them to search for the grail more effectively?
7. Why do the children hear an owl in the daytime?
8. What system do the children use to communicate with each other when Simon and Barney are in the cave?
9. What happens to the original treasure map?
10. What happens to the grail?

Friday, January 15, 2016

Reading Period 14: January 16 - 22: Over Sea, Under Stone

Class meeting: No class meeting! Netzers are out of town.
Due date: January 21, 7pm

Long read:

Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper, chapters 6-10

Short read:
"The Golden Fleece" by Nathaniel Hawthorne. This is American author Nathaniel Hawthorne's version of the Greek myth of Jason and the Argonauts. If you have read the myth before, you may recognize it!

Poem:

"Cargoes" by John Masefield. This is the poem Jane was thinking of when she referenced "apes and peacocks."

Quinquireme of Nineveh from distant Ophir,
Rowing home to haven in sunny Palestine,
With a cargo of ivory,
And apes and peacocks,
Sandalwood, cedarwood, and sweet white wine.

Stately Spanish galleon coming from the Isthmus,
Dipping through the Tropics by the palm-green shores,
With a cargo of diamonds,
Emeralds, amythysts,
Topazes, and cinnamon, and gold moidores.

Dirty British coaster with a salt-caked smoke stack,
Butting through the Channel in the mad March days,
With a cargo of Tyne coal,
Road-rails, pig-lead,
Firewood, iron-ware, and cheap tin trays.



Excerpt from "The Holy Grail" from The Idylls of the King by Alfred Lord Tennyson

"The cup, the cup itself, from which our Lord
Drank at the last sad supper with his own.
This, from the blessed land of Aromat –
After the day of darkness, when the dead
Went wandering o'er Moriah – the good saint
Arimathaean Joseph, journ
eying brought
To Glastonbury, where the winter thorn
Blossoms at Christmas, mindful of our Lord.
And there awhile it bode; and if a man
Could touch or see it, he was healed at once,
By faith, of all his ills. But then the times
Grew to such evil that the holy cup
Was caught away to Heaven, and disappeared."

Creative Assignment:

Go outside and find a place where you can look around and see different shapes and outlines in the buildings and trees that surround you. Make a map like the map in the book, where the outline of the map lines up in a perspective drawing to the surroundings you see around you. Now think of a hint you can place on the map, to allow someone else to find the exact spot he or she should stand to read the map in the correct way.

OR

Write a poem like "Cargoes" in which you compare a vessel carrying an interesting and exotic cargo to a vessel carrying a boring, normal one. You might compare a school bus full of children excited to go to the zoo on a field trip to a prison bus full of inmates headed to jail. Or a semi truck hauling Lego kits to a semi truck hauling regular bricks.

Writing Assignment:

How would the story Over Sea, Under Stone be different if told by the parents instead of the children? What details would they include from their vacation to the sea? What would be missing? Write 100 words from the perspective of Dr. or Mrs. Drew, telling about their summer vacation in Trewissick.

OR

Great Uncle Merry encourages the children to take off on their own and do some risky things without telling their parents. Do you think this is wise? Often in adventure stories written for children the parents are either clueless or dead. Why is this? How would the story have gone differently if Great Uncle Merry had done the responsible thing and told the children's parents immediately about everything that was going on? Write 100 words about the role of parents in children's adventure stories, and include your opinion about Jane, Simon, and Barney's behavior as they keep their parents out of the loop in this particular novel.

Quiz:

1. Why will good never fully defeat evil or evil fully defeat good, according to Great Uncle Merry?
2. How old is the map the children found?
3. Who do the kids run into at the headland near the stones?
4. Why was it a good thing Simon turned the way he did, onto Tregoney road, instead of running the other way?
5. What is the sign that waxes and wanes but does not die?
6. Great Uncle Merry says Penzance is full of little brass piskies. What are piskies?
7. Why does Mrs. Palk say she wants Barney to stay back?
8. Describe the man that Jane and Simon saw among the standing stones in the moonlight. What is his identity?
9. Who was creeping around Barney's room with a flashlight?
10. Who helps the children find the hole in the rocks?

Friday, January 8, 2016

Reading Period 13: January 9 - 15: Over Sea, Under Stone

Class meeting: January 15
Due date: January 14, 7pm

Long read: Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper, chapters 1-5

Short read:

"Merlin the Enchanter," short story by Thomas Higginson, from Tales of the Enchanted Isles. I hate posting links with ads, so here are two:
This link is ad-free but the formatting is a little more difficult.
This link has ads but is easier to read I guess.

Poetry:

excerpt from Merlin and Vivien by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

In Love, if Love be Love, if Love be ours,
Faith and unfaith can ne’er be equal powers:
Unfaith in aught is want of faith in all.

It is the little rift within the lute,
That by and by will make the music mute,
And ever widening slowly silence all.

The little rift within the lover’s lute,
Or little pitted speck in garner’d fruit,
That rotting inward slowly moulders all.

It is not worth the keeping: let it go:
But shall it? answer, darling, answer, no.
And trust me not at all or all in all.


Creative Assignment:

Choose three of the treasures of England from the list in the story, "Merlin the Enchanter." Draw a comic incorporating all three -- either being misused in a funny way, or discovered and used properly, or mistaken for regular household objects, or something from your own imagination. Your comic should have at least four panels.

OR

Read the whole poem, "Merlin and Vivien" by Tennyson. Create a prose translation of the poem. That means write a story that tells what happened in the poem, using your own words in regular sentences instead of poetry. This is a tough assignment but I know you can do it! Write at least 200 words.

Writing Assignment:

Choose one of these walking routes from South Cornwall, after looking over all of them. One even includes a village called Trelissick! Using Google Maps and Street View (drag the little yellow guy in the bottom right corner onto the map to get to street view, or ask someone to help you) get as close as you can to the route so you can see how it looks. Now, after reading the description and looking at some photos or street views of the places, write a 200 word essay describing your imaginary walk down this route. Include specific details about what you hear, see, smell, and feel as you walk. You can add an element of adventure if you want.

Could this Cornwall fishing village be Trewissick?

OR

The three Drew siblings each have their own personalities, and the relationships between them are very different. Using specific quotes from the book to support your points, write 200 words about the roles the three children play within their group. Who is the leader? Who is the caretaker? Who comes up with the ideas? Who is the explainer? Who causes trouble? Who is the peacemaker? Where is the conflict? Put quotation marks around your evidence from the text.

Quiz:

1. In what mythology is Barnaby particularly interested?
2. Choose one moment in chapter 1 that shows Jane and Simon's relationship. Tell what happens and explain what it tells you about them.
3. Personification is a literary device where human qualities are given to animals, things or ideas. When stars dance, opportunity knocks, or a flashlight glares, that's personification. Find the personification in the following passage:
The light was beginning to die, and as the sun sank behind their headland the sea was turning to dark grey-green, and slow mist was creeping into the harbor. 
4. What does it mean when Simon says, "What a swizz"?
5. By what accident does Barney find the map?
6. What does Mrs. Drew do for work?
7. How did Great Uncle Merry behave when the Withers siblings appeared at the door?
8. Why does Jane decide to go and visit the Vicar?
9. Why does Dr. Drew find the burglary mysterious?
10. Who do the children decide to tell about the map?