Saturday, October 29, 2016

Reading Period 7: October 28 - November 3: Romeo and Juliet

Due Dates: (Adjusted for Halloween)
Quiz: Wednesday, November 2
Assignments: Friday, November 7

Long Read:

Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare, Acts 1 and 2

Poem:

This is a poem we will be memorizing! Get started by reading it every day.

"Shall I Compare Thee To a Summer's Day?"

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand’rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow’st.
     So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
     So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Creative Assignment:

In scene 1 (p. 13), Lord Montague says Romeo is like a "bud bit with an envious worm / Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air, / Or dedicate his beauty to the sun." In scene two (p 23), Benvolio challenges Romeo to compare Rosaline to other women at the Capulet's party, saying "Compare her face with some that I shall show / And I will make thee think thy swan a crow." In scene 3 (p 29), Lady Capulet says, "This precious book of love, this unbound lover, / To beautify him, only lacks a cover." In scene 4 (p. 31) Romeo says, "You have dancing shoes / With nimble soles, I have a soul of lead / So stakes me to the ground I cannot move." You may find many other examples of figurative language in this play, where the characters use images to explain what they mean. Create an illustration of one of these examples of figurative language, where you draw it out literally. Show me the bud and the envious worm, the swans and crows, or the book of love and the cover it needs. Use unlined paper and some kind of color in your illustration.

OR

Read this page about Shakespearean sonnets. It uses our poem this week as an example, which will help you get a jump on reading and understanding it. Now try your hand at writing your own sonnet. It must have three quatrains and a couplet. It must have ABAB CDCD EFEF GG rhyme scheme. It must be in iambic pentameter. Don't know what those things mean? We'll talk lots about sonnets in class. For now, read about it on No Sweat Shakespeare, at the link above, and do your very best!

Writing Assignment:

Remember our writing assignment about how characters in Ivanhoe demonstrated the conflict in their world? We're going to do a similar assignment for Romeo and Juliet. Even the title indicates there will be some pairing and parallels in this play. In sonnets and in drama, the concept of "antithesis" means creating opposites in conflict. One of these pairs is Mercutio and Benvolio. Another is Lady Capulet and Lord Montague, Romeo and Tybalt. Choose two characters and think about their behavior and personalities in the first two acts. Write a compare and contrast essay of 200 words, showing how these characters are in opposition to each other. You could even use Romeo and Juliet since they are from opposing families. Use at least two quotes from the book to support your ideas!

OR

Shakespeare mixes comedy in with the more serious scenes in the play. Write a 200 word essay in which you track the comic and serious scenes through the first two acts. If you think about organization, your paper may have four paragraphs. One introducing your idea, two about act 1, three about act 2, and four taking the reader to a new place. Maybe you could speculate about why Shakespeare does this mixing, or maybe you could talk about another book that mixes comedy and tragedy, or the idea of a comic relief character, or maybe talk about what the play would be like without one of these elements -- anything new you can give your reader in the conclusion.

Quiz:

This quiz is over Act 1 and 2 of Romeo and Juliet.

1. What two families are at war in the play?
2. What lady is Romeo in love with in Act 1 Scene 2?
3. How old is Juliet, and who does Juliet's mother want her to marry?
4. Is Mercutio a Montague or a Capulet?
5. Who figures out that Romeo has crashed the Capulet party?
6. Give one image that Juliet compares their love to, on page 59.
7. Paraphrase these lines. What is Romeo saying here?
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books,
But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.
8. Friar Lawrence agrees to marry Romeo and Juliet, even though he feels like Romeo is inconstant. Why? (look at lines 90-92)
9. Who is going to carry news of Romeo's plan to Juliet?
10. Based on his speech at the top of page 87, what can you say about Friar Lawrence's attitude toward love?


Friday, October 14, 2016

Reading Period 6: October 14-20: Oliver Twist

Long Read:

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, chapters 15-30

Poem:

Holy Thursday (Twas on a Holy Thursday, their innocent faces clean)
Holy Thursday (Is this a holy thing to see)

Creative Assignments:

Pretend you are a reporter. You were tipped off by the police that a robbery has occurred outside Write a newspaper article reporting on the robbery at a house outside Chertsey. You go to the house and interview Mr. Giles, Brittles, Mrs. Maylie, and Rose. Write an article reporting this news, including correctly-punctuated quotes from all four of the interviews. Only use information in the article that the characters are willing to tell you.

OR

William Blake was a Victorian poet who, like Charles Dickens, believed that part of his job as a writer was exposing and discussing the unfairness of poverty and the fate of English poor children. He wrote two poems called "Holy Thursday" and this pair of poems shows two views of the poor children who come to church during Holy Week. For your assignment, create two illustrations, one for each of these poems. You must use unlined paper, and color, and include details from the poems. The illustrations should reflect the contrasting moods of the two works. You don't have to include the text of the poem in your illustration, but just so you can see how Blake was thinking about it, here are his illustrations of his own works:




Writing Assignment:

Are people basically good, trying to do what's right and be kind to each other? Or are people basically bad, only doing the right thing when they have to, or when it serves their own interest, and other times doing whatever is best for themselves? For this assignment, you must pick a side and argue that position, using characters from Oliver Twist as examples. It's absolutely possible to choose either side of the argument and effectively make your point, depending on which characters you bring up. In class on Tuesday we will work on an outline for this essay, and you'll turn in a first draft, along with the outline, on Thursday.

Quiz:

1. What was the criminals' first clue as to Oliver's whereabouts? This answer comes toward the end of chapter 16.
2. Paraphrase the first paragraph of chapter 17. In just one sentence, what is Dickens telling us here?
3. Give a specific detail from the book that shows the state of the house that Oliver is staying in with Fagin.
4. Paraphrase the following: "If you don't take fogles and tickers, some other cove will; so that the coves that lose 'em will be all the worse, and you'll be all the worse too, and nobody half a ha'p'orth the better, except the chaps wot gets them -- and you've just as good a right to them as they have."
5. Why is Oliver perfect for Bill Sikes' plan to get into the house he wants to rob?
6. What does Bill Sikes threaten Oliver with, if he talks?
7. What is Oliver supposed to do, to help with the robbery?
8. What is the purpose of Mr. Bumble's visit to Mrs. Corney?
9. Who is the old woman who almost tells a secret before she dies in chapter 24? What is her connection to Oliver?
10. What does Toby Crackit report to Fagin about Oliver?
11. Why does Nancy hope that Oliver is dead?
12. Why do Noah and Charlotte get in trouble with Mr. Bumble?
13. To what house does Oliver go for help, when he wakes up?
14. Who shot Oliver?
15. What does the doctor ask Mr. Giles and Brittles to do, at the end of chapter 30? And do they do it?

Friday, October 7, 2016

Reading Period 5: October 7-13: Oliver Twist

Jack Dawkins: Friend or Foe?
Long Read: Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, chapters 6-15

Poem: Choose one poem from "When You Are Old," "The Two Trees," and "The Stolen Child" to memorize. You should have handouts in your folder for all three. Read this poem aloud to yourself or to someone else every day this week.

Creative Assignment:

Charles Dickens creates vivid characters and then gives them descriptive names to help bring them alive. Characters like The Artful Dodger, Mr. Bumble, Mr. Fang, Mrs. Sowerberry, and Bill Sikes have personalities that are easy to imagine. Try visualizing four of the characters in Oliver Twist as animals, and create illustrations of them with animal bodies. What animal would Mr. Brownlow be? How about Oliver himself? In your illustrations, you can give them Victorian clothes, or you can dress them in modern attire.

OR

The name "The Artful Dodger" has really captured the imagination of a lot of business owners. It has been used for lots of pubs, coffee shops, tattoo parlors, and restaurants in England and the rest of the world. Pretend you are going to open a business in Norfolk called The Artful Dodger, and you're looking for investors. It can be a hair salon, a bakery, a music shop, or whatever you like. Write a letter to your rich friends describing your plan: the location, the building you'll be in, the decor, the menu or services offered, the staff, any details you can think of that make the project sound like an exciting investment.

Writing Assignment:

Write a persuasive essay of 250 words. In your essay, you will argue one of the following positions: 1. People who commit crimes must always be punished according to the law. or 2. It's okay to be merciful and just let criminals go free. For an illustrative example in your essay, use the characters and scenes from Oliver Twist. In your essay, you must pick a side and STICK TO IT! No "on the other hand" or "I can see it both ways." Here are some persuasive phrases to include in your essay: As the evidence shows, Bearing in mind, Now is the time, Strongly recommend, When you consider that, Deeply concerned, Taking into account, Many people think, Without a doubt, Shouldn't we consider, That is the reason why, The truth of the matter, We must remember. Those writers in Ms. Maryann's "What's Your Opinion" class will recognize these! Try to use three of them.

Quiz:

1. What did Noah say to Oliver that threw Oliver into a violent rage?
2. On what does Mr. Bumble blame Oliver's violent behavior?
3. What is Jack Dawkins' nickname?
4. Fagin says that the boys manufacture the pocketbooks and handkerchiefs but where do they really get them?
5. Why does the narrator think that the phrase "Stop! Thief!" is so attractive to people?
6. Dickens names characters to reflect their personalities or their role in the story. Give an example of a character in chapter 11 that has a descriptive name.
7. Give two details from the text that show that Mr. Brownlow is taking good care of Oliver.
8. What does Fagin send Nancy to find out, and why is he worried about it?
9. On what errand does Mr. Brownlow send Oliver, and what does Mr. Grimwig think will happen as a result of this errand?
10. Who does Oliver meet on his way to do Mr. Brownlow's errand?