Friday, September 15, 2017

Reading Period 3: September 15-21: The Three Musketeers

Long Read: The Three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas, chapters 40-67

Short Read: "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" by Stephen Crane

Poem: "La Rochelle" by Richard Aldington. There are two lines on the next page; get them by clicking the right arrow.

Creative Assignments:

The first stanza of the poem "La Rochelle" by Richard Aldington shows a version of La Rochelle long after the siege, a sweet picture of a pleasant seaside town. But the author doesn't want us to forget the "iron men" who defended La Rochelle and starved and died there. The second stanza  Write a poem about a battlefield you may have visited in Virginia. You could even write about the Battle of Hampton Roads which took place in the rivers off Norfolk. In your poem, emulate the form of Aldington's poem. So in your first stanza, talk about the scene as it is now. In your second stanza, remind the reader of what it was like when the battle was being waged. Study the poem and use the same techniques -- colors, sounds, and visual details to invoke your scene.

OR

After the siege of La Rochelle, Louis XIII had himself painted being crowned by victory.


Here are a couple of other portraits of this modest fella:


That's La Rochelle down there. Probable caption: #PWNED

When you are king, you have to make sure portraits of you are always super powerful and super perfect, so you can remind people of how great you are. Pretend you are the king or queen of the universe. Paint or draw a portrait of yourself looking incredibly powerful and important, possibly with lightning bolts shooting out your eyes, surrounded by symbols of your power, and riding high on a boatload of victory.

For extra bonus fun, use your Photoshop skillz if you have them to put some "regular guy" clothes on the images of Louis, above. What would he look like in blue jeans and a Radiohead tshirt? What if instead of a scepter he was holding a remote?

Writing Assignments:

It's time to watch a movie version of The Three Musketeers! So many versions to choose from, including a recent one where the Duke of Buckingham arrives at the Louvre on an airship! Before you watch a movie version, though, please consider what choices you would make if you were producing a movie. Write a 250 word essay in which you talk about what parts of the book you might cut out, what characters you might cut out, and how you would simplify the novel. Or, you can make the case for filming a miniseries or a trilogy, so that all the piece of the novel and all the characters could be represented. After you post your assignment, watch a movie version. Then you can come back to your post and rant and rave in a comment about how perfect and wonderful or how infuriatingly awful the movie was.

OR

Just like the sheriff in "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" by Stephen Crane, the characters in The Three Musketeers have public and private identities. When these clash, the story develops. Write a 250 word essay in which you compare Jack Potter, whose public identity as a gun-slinging sheriff clashes with his private identity as a husband and family man, to a character in the novel who is similarly at odds with himself. One good idea would be Aramis, who repeats that he is only an interim musketeer because he wants to join the priesthood, and yet fights violently and loves passionately.  Use specific events from the novel to support your comparison.

Quiz: 

In lieu of a reading comprehension quiz this week, please define these vocabulary words:

1. Provincial
2. Connoisseur
3. Patois
4. Physiognomy
5. Protégé
6. Coquetry
7. Ransacked
8. Posterity
9. Reproach
10. Incontinence
11. Alibi
12. Lackey
13. Misanthropic
14. Fanfanorade
15. Rendezvous
16. Bourgeois
17. Apprehended
18. Bastille
19. Decamp
20. Edict

Don't forget to write about The Three Musketeers in your personal archive!

No comments:

Post a Comment