Friday, October 13, 2017

Reading Period 6: October 13-19: The Black Stallion

Long Read:

The Black Stallion by Walter Farley,
chapters 13-18

Poems:

I Saw From the Beach 
by Thomas Moore

I saw from the beach, when the morning was shining,
A bark o'er the waters move gloriously on;
I came when the sun o'er that beach was declining,
The bark was still there, but the waters were gone.

And such is the fate of our life's early promise,
So passing the spring-tide of joy we have known;
Each wave that we danced on at morning ebbs from us,
And leaves us, at eve, on the bleak shore alone.

Oh, who would not welcome that moment's returning
When passion first waked a new life through his frame,
And his soul, like the wood that grows precious in burning,
Gave out all its sweets to love's exquisite flame.

On the Beach at Night, Alone. 
by Walt Whitman

ON the beach at night alone,
As the old mother sways her to and fro, singing her husky song,
As I watch the bright stars shining—I think a thought of the clef of the universes, and of
the future.

A VAST SIMILITUDE interlocks all,
All spheres, grown, ungrown, small, large, suns, moons, planets, comets, asteroids,
All the substances of the same, and all that is spiritual upon the same,
All distances of place, however wide,
All distances of time—all inanimate forms,
All Souls—all living bodies, though they be ever so different, or in different worlds,
All gaseous, watery, vegetable, mineral processes—the fishes, the brutes,
All men and women—me also;
All nations, colors, barbarisms, civilizations, languages;
All identities that have existed, or may exist, on this globe, or any globe;
All lives and deaths—all of the past, present, future;
This vast similitude spans them, and always has spann’d, and shall forever span them, and
compactly hold them, and enclose them.

The ocean said to me once 
by Stephen Crane

The ocean said to me once,
"Look!
Yonder on the shore
Is a woman, weeping.
I have watched her.
Go you and tell her this --
Her lover I have laid
In cool green hall.
There is wealth of golden sand
And pillars, coral-red;
Two white fish stand guard at his bier.
"Tell her this
And more --
That the king of the seas
Weeps too, old, helpless man.
The bustling fates
Heap his hands with corpses
Until he stands like a child
With a surplus of toys."

In class we discussed the three poems above, and everyone chose one to memorize! This week we're going to get started on that in a major way.

Creative Assignment:

Write your chosen poem out by hand in three different ways. You might choose to write it on lined paper with a pen, and then on a whiteboard, and then in pencil on graph paper. You might choose to put it on your street in chalk, or use markers of all different colors, or punch it into tin with an awl. You might decide to quilt it into a piece of fabric, or dry erase it onto a window, or spell it out in scrabble tiles. However you choose to do it, you must show three DIFFERENT versions. I guarantee when you are done with this, you will be well on your way to memorizing it.

OR

Create three different videos of yourself reading the poem aloud in different locations/situations. You could read it in the bathtub, on the sofa, or you could have someone video you reading it as  you hang out an upstairs window and shout. Your attire must be different for each video -- so you might read it once in pajamas, once in a viking hat, and once in a tutu. These videos will stay private to our Google+ Community -- don't worry! I will record videos later of us all reciting our poems, and these I will ask permission to post on the blog.

"Hoi. The name's Steve. I got a poem fer ya."
Writing Assignment:

Consider the author of your chosen poem. Write a short essay (250 words) about him, including biographical information, and also any context you find for the poem you're memorizing. So, you'll want to find out when in his life the poem was published, how it was received, and what literary movement or period it was part of. You can use Wikipedia if you like, but you must include one other source as well. Do NOT copy and paste from your sources. Use them to learn information and then write your own words. Include the (2) links to your sources at the end of your paper.

OR

Consider Walter Farley. Write a short essay (250 words) about him, including biographical information, and also any context you can find for the novel, The Black Stallion. You'll want to find out when in his life it was written, how it was received, and what effect it had on his life and career. You can use Wikipedia if you like, but you must include one other internet source as well. Do NOT copy and paste from your sources. Use them to learn information and then write your own words. Include the (2) links to your sources at the end of your paper.

OR

If you read National Velvet during Stickybeak's first year, write a short essay (300 words) comparing National Velvet and The Black Stallion. Start out by making objective comparisons without including your opinions -- what about the two novels is the same and what is different? Then you can move to comparing your reactions to the two novels -- which you liked better and why you think that is true.

QUIZ:

1. Why does The Black not want to leave the barn, and how do they solve this problem?
2. How many times did The Black go around the track the first time they let him run on it?
3. Who is Jim Neville?
4. Why is the Match Race between Sun Raider and Cyclone the only race The Black can do?
5. Why does Jim Neville already know of Henry Dailey?
6. Why does Alec have strands of The Black's mane clasped in his hands after the ride for Jim Neville?
7. Why is Alec's mom in Chicago during the Match Race?
8. When Alec's dad thinks the race is too dangerous, what is Henry Dailey's argument back?
9. What does Alec have to do before riding in the race that's just a regular kid thing?
10. From whose point of view do we find out about the race itself?

No comments:

Post a Comment